Relative Something

*this* John W. Hays' take on things and experiences

Posts Tagged ‘attitude adjustment

Feeling Sympathy

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This morning we are feeling sympathy for the people who are experiencing the full impact of hurricane Harvey along the Gulf coast of Texas and Louisiana.

At home, the welcome signs are out for another Wintervale workshop, but the weather is anything but welcoming. It is wet, wet, wet, with gray skies and soggy soil.

It is not conducive to our outdoor activities with the horses, but it is so far from the devastating situation unfolding to our south, that we feel no justification in moping about it.

May the people under the catastrophic flooding of Harvey experience peace amid the turmoil and relief, somehow, sooner than they expect.

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Written by johnwhays

August 26, 2017 at 9:37 am

Boulders Rocking

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While we were standing around the center of labyrinth Wednesday night, I glanced at the big boulders and immediately sensed something seemed different. One of them seems to be settling into an increased lean away from the other. It comes as no surprise, since the soil is so incredibly saturated around here. dscn5410e

It has me wondering what it will be like this winter when the ground freezes. Will the excess water in the surface soil create more in the way of heaving? Could those boulders get pushed over on their sides?

Maybe when the tree finally gets established, we can get rid of the boulders altogether and let the maple take their place.

What do I mean by we ? By the time that happens, I probably won’t be around anymore and those decisions will likely be someone else’s to make.

For this moment, I am going to work on tending to the boulders to the best of my ability, while also finding a way to adjust my attitude so that I will accept the unexpected results that nature serves up.

I’m sure hoping that nature will serve up a healthy and vibrant transplanted tree. If that happens, I will find it much less concerning if/when the boulders shift into a new and different orientation from the one with which we started.

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Written by johnwhays

November 4, 2016 at 6:00 am

That Guy

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I don’t think I’m that guy, but Cyndie says I might be. One of the reasons I have historically eschewed gas-powered equipment comes from the demands of maintaining the machines. If a device is electric, and all I need to do is turn it on to use it and back off when I’m done, that would suit me just fine. Maybe change the brushes if you keep it long enough, or take care of the batteries if it’s got ’em, but that’s about it.

It’s all the stinky gasoline, oil, air filters, fuel filters, and spark plugs of gas-powered engines that weighs on me. I don’t want to deal with them, so I wait. But how long can I get away with avoiding it without suffering performance problems? I prefer to have my machines functioning at their peak.

After putting our Craftsman lawn tractor through rather rough use, and suffering the consequences of a frustrating degradation in performance, I’ve adjusted my attitude about the machine.

Ironically, this ends up being less about the gas engine and more about the general use of the machine as a lawn mower. I really did use the thing with reckless abandon, mowing over rocks and sticks, heading down our rustic trails and over sharp drop offs, sometimes into wet areas where there was standing water.

The mower responded accordingly, bending and breaking when limits were exceeded.

I figured it was a piece of crap and that I should look into getting a heavy-duty commercial grade machine that could take such abuse. A mechanic at my favorite hardware store helped me to see it otherwise.

We already own a power trimmer. I should be using that appliance in all the afore-mentioned rough areas. My lawn mower is designed to cut lawn grass. If I use it as designed, it will do the job well.

img_ip1722eIn the past, when I finished driving the mower through all the abuse, I parked it and walked away, glad to be done with that nuisance of a chore. I was aware that grass would collect and build up under the mower deck, but it was hard to access, so I saved it for some other time.

I was tired, and the mowing was done. The last thing I wanted to do was mess with the job of clean up.

I wasn’t that guy.

Well, not entirely. Not yet, anyway.

Maybe I’m getting closer. Yesterday, Anneliese saw me cleaning the mower deck and asked if it had gotten plugged. That made total sense to my old way of thinking. You clean it when it stops working well.

Not any more.

No, it wasn’t plugged. Since the informative visit with the mechanic who gladly sells me products and services, I have changed my methods. I pull off the deck after each mowing, flip it over, and clean out the accumulated gunk, before the mower ever gets even close to plugging.

The same as the way that guy would do it.

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Trying Not

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I’m trying not to succumb to the outrage. Outrage may well be deserved, but it doesn’t serve me well. I have to choose a different path. I strive to avoid getting my feathers stuck in the tar of controversial opposing opinions, but maybe venting about some of the insanity will bring about an inspiration to counter the inherent despair.

Does any of this make sense?

How did Wells Fargo bank get away with years of creating bogus accounts without customers’ consent?

How did the Sugar Association get away with paying off Harvard scientists?

How do political campaigns succeed by only focusing on the perceived bad things about other candidates without providing any substance of their own in ads?

How did we get to a point where there are only two unpopular primary candidates for President of the United States?

How do people feel comfortable publicly supporting a candidate who demonstrates such contemptible characteristics?

Why do people allow religious ideology to lead them down a path of choosing to injure and kill others?

What if creative people like Lennon & McCartney were able to write songs about peace and love for all of the world to hear?

What if that made all the difference?

All you need is love.

Love is all you need.

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Pequenita consoling me while I distract myself with word games… That’s love.

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Written by johnwhays

September 21, 2016 at 6:00 am