Relative Something

*this* John W. Hays' take on things and experiences

Posts Tagged ‘photography

Interesting Perch

leave a comment »

.

Does anything stand out to you in this rocky photo of our pond that I captured yesterday?

.

.

Yes, that’s our permanent resident metal frog on one of the rocks with an intrepid visiting frog perched on its back.

.

Perfect.

.

.

 

Written by johnwhays

July 4, 2020 at 8:24 am

Nature’s Fireworks

leave a comment »

Our lillies are popping open like Independence Day fireworks, …except without all the noise pollution.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

July 3, 2020 at 6:00 am

So Little

leave a comment »

There are days when I want nothing more than to be standing again in the high Himalayas gazing at surrounding peaks and the valleys between.

These days I find plenty of solace in the wide-open spaces of our rural paradise where the variety of skies provides endless fascination.

It serves to remind me that we are so little and the universe so vast.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

July 2, 2020 at 6:00 am

Envision

leave a comment »

.

Words on Images

.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

June 11, 2020 at 6:00 am

Garden Salad

with 2 comments

I didn’t expect it this soon after planting, but over the weekend Cyndie served up the first salad with kale and spinach from her garden. It was fabulous tasting, as well as a wonderful reward to be eating something she has grown right here at home.

Our other weekend meal was a last-minute decision to order take-out from our nearby destination restaurant, Shady Grove. We have not been to a restaurant since the pandemic outbreak and have only had pizza and Chinese takeout up until now. When Cyndie stepped in the door to pick up our haute cuisine food, she found she was the only person wearing a mask.

Hope the patrons weren’t all traveling long distances to congregate in close proximity for a couple of hours of conversation and food. We aren’t aware of any reported cases of COVID-19 in the immediate area and most of the people we have seen are responding with understandable casualness over the risks, but who knows what might arrive undetected with travelers from afar.

Interested in protecting those around us in other parts of our lives, we opt for not sitting inside with the rest of the unfamiliar folks and dine at home for now. Neither of us is very concerned about our risk of getting sick, but we each are very interested in not becoming an unwitting carrier who could spread the illness to her family or my coworkers.

When I was down in the woods on Sunday cutting up the latest of the fallen trees, I had a thought that we should probably be focusing on planting new trees to make up for all the ones we lose. Then I realized that we find uncountable numbers of new trees popping up every spring, to a fault. They show up everywhere, particularly noticeable in places we don’t want them. In our landscaping around the house, underneath preferred mature trees, and too close to buildings.

Nature plants more trees than we ever could. We just need to figure out how to manage them.

While writing about the salad and all the new trees sprouting, I thought it would be perfect to include an image of each. Unfortunately, I didn’t take a picture of either. Instead, you get two recent versions of our sky overhead, one taken by Cyndie and one by me. Guess which one is from me.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

We’ve been blessed with a pretty good balance of rainstorms and warm sunny days. It has made for some pretty good progress in growing salad greens and baby trees.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

June 9, 2020 at 6:00 am

Unknown

leave a comment »

.

Words on Images

.

.

Written by johnwhays

April 30, 2020 at 6:00 am

Hello Halo

with 2 comments

We were blessed with a thrilling atmospheric spectacle last weekend in the form of a halo around the sun. Cyndie called me to the front door to look up and see it, but all I could do was squint into the bright light in the sky. I couldn’t see a thing. She grabbed me by the shoulders and moved me over to the spot where she was standing, where a pine tree blocked the sun.

“Oh! There it is!”

Thanks, universe. That was really cool.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

April 22, 2020 at 6:00 am

Posted in Chronicle

Tagged with , , , ,

Ageless

leave a comment »

.

.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

April 17, 2020 at 6:00 am

Conclusions

with 2 comments

.

Words on Images

.

.

.

Written by johnwhays

March 19, 2020 at 6:00 am

Trail Bulge

leave a comment »

For some reason, the heaving path down the middle of our trails fascinates me. Some days the bulge stands out dramatically. Yesterday, I tried to take pictures that would show how high it had risen, but the two-dimensional images just don’t do it justice.

First, I tried shooting from my eye height when standing. Then I crouched down and snapped a shot for comparison.

I’m not sure there is any difference between the two for revealing the surprising upheaval of earth compared to the ground on either side of it.

The hump is frozen solid, but the very top surface of leaves and dirt melt just enough to get slippery. It becomes a challenge of constantly choosing whether to step on the residual ice or the decaying leaves for the better footing, ever wary that either could result in a slip.

Add in the frequent jolts on the leash when Delilah wants to make haste after some critter ahead and it’s a wonder we ever make it back to the house clean and dry.

When the trail offers better all-snow footing, and during the summer when it’s not very wet, I occasionally allow Delilah to race as fast as she wants and run behind her, but that is chaos for planting my feet. It tends to be at a pace that I can’t maintain for very long, after which she willingly settles down to a brisk walk and I spend the rest of the jaunt gasping to recover my breath.

Over the weekend, I noticed that it is the corner fence posts that are all getting pushed up, despite my having released much of the tension from the wires.

It is easy to push the fence posts back down using the loader on the diesel tractor. Almost too easy. The first time I tried it, I was shocked over how little resistance there was to the hydraulic power and weight of the bucket. The complication is that the period of time when the ground is thawed enough to easily accept the posts being pushed down, the tires sink in and put me at risk of getting stuck and/or tearing up the surrounding turf something awful.

It becomes a classic case of timing being everything.

I’m not going to worry about the fence posts for now, but I will be anxiously awaiting the trails getting back to flat again as soon as the frost goes out of the ground.

Bring on the spring mud season!

.

.

Written by johnwhays

March 17, 2020 at 6:00 am