Relative Something

*this* John W. Hays' take on things and experiences

Posts Tagged ‘news headlines

Feeling Crummy

with 6 comments

Imagine you have been out of town, traveling on a commercial airline, attending graduation events with throngs of others who have traveled from far and wide and you arrive home feeling less than your best in the third year of a pandemic.

Out of an excess of caution, Cyndie chose to wear a mask when she got home until she verifies by test whether she was feeling crummy because of the dreaded virus or simply some other easily possible reason. Allergies? Travel fatigue?

A nap was enough to get her out walking the dog and pulling some dreaded invasive garlic mustard plants while I was trimming and hauling away more branches from the lower portion of evergreen trees along the driveway.

I can never tell when she is truly ill because she tends to maintain her activities regardless.

After catching up with some news headlines, I was feeling kind of crummy until I happened upon the tidbit about the small trial for cancer treatment that resulted in an unheard-of complete remission in all patients.

Imagine hoping your treatment protocol might help some patients and then learning it made tumors vanish in all 18 participants.

I believe that would be the opposite of feeling crummy.

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Written by johnwhays

June 7, 2022 at 6:00 am

Thinking Contrarily

with 3 comments

The coronavirus variants are causing the pandemic to not go away as much as people wished it would. When not worried about a wildfire or flash floods ravaging homes, the threat of COVID continues to linger large in people’s minds. Some folks have decided to think contrarily about protecting themselves from the virus. Instead of accepting a free vaccine that is the prevailing solution for the pandemic, they decide to pay someone for a livestock dewormer.

Instead of thinking about how to protect their children from a threatening contagious illness by wearing a mask indoors, they choose to focus on how oppressive it is to be told to wear a mask and begin imagining that wearing a mask is actually harmful to their kids.

I get it. I have contrarian tendencies, myself. I choose to wear my belt so the buckle is on my side instead of front and center. Because, why not?

I’m wondering if the concept of virus variants prolonging the pandemic couldn’t contrarily be applied to variants of love that can improve the health and well-being of the human race.

What if oppressive regimes the world over were to become influenced by a new variation of love that morphed into one that overwhelmed their pillars of greed, power, and control?

What if a new mutation of common sense were to evolve and imbue the minds of people who have difficulty thinking for themselves or find it hard to recognize when a grifter is fleecing them?

What if domestic house cats overcame their urge to bother sleeping humans during the wee hours of darkness when sleep is so precious? Okay, that one is really a stretch, but there could be some variation of that tendency that is less crazy-making, couldn’t there? Please?

If thinking contrarily about controversial subjects can lead to some insane results, it seems only logical, being a contrarian, that thinking contrarily about non-controversial subjects could lead to some increasingly sensible and practical results.

A contrary decision to something good doesn’t have to be bad. It could contrarily be better than good!

Let’s put our contrarian tendencies to good use and find new ways to morph love into a continually more effective influence on the world at large.

Let love be the world religion. No dogma. No doctrine. Just L. O. V. E.

L.

O.

V.

E.

I want to hear about variants of love that are more contagious than any previous love we experienced before.

Let it command the lead story of newscasts and fill front-page headlines.

Unstoppable spread of unbelievably contagious love!

Contrary to the norm, let it be that people grow to respond with more fascination and interest to headlines like these than to the negative stories of old.

Can you say, “enlightenment?”

Oh, you contrarian, you.

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