Relative Something

*this* John W. Hays' take on things and experiences

Posts Tagged ‘common sense

Another Way

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There is about as much information being blasted into the world right now as there are virus germs and sanitizing spray. It’s all a bit mind-boggling, but the crackpot theories are a particularly fascinating dose of lunacy. I suppose all human conditions tend to amplify in times of global crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic sure has taken attention away from the equally global threatening planet-warming that industry and fossil-fuel dependence has hastened.

The Associated Press provides clean reviews of falsehoods around the virus and politics that serve to expose some of the deviously manipulated claims that then get shared and reshared on social media so many times they gain believability points among the less astute.

Even within the credible reports about which surprisingly common underlying health conditions are making the coronavirus more severe, there is such a vast amount of pertinent detail it gets overwhelming. As much as we assume it’s lungs that are taking the primary hit, evidence reveals the heart is being damaged from within.

As often happens, I find myself thinking about things in another way. As we begin to take a more focused look at how the virus can spread by our actions, it reveals how often we’ve already been sharing. Think about how many contacts we have had without getting incredibly ill. All those sporting events we attended, the concerts and plays, lectures, public transportation, shopping carts, and doorknobs grabbed.

The number of germ-phobic people who hyper-sanitized their way through daily activities was minuscule compared to the majority of us who took our chances and tried to remember to occasionally wash our hands after touching anything publicly shared.

It’s a wonder the time between pandemics was as long as it has been throughout history.

Here’s another way to think about this pandemic. Don’t be gullible to every crazy thing you see or hear. Recognize your emotional response and reasonable fears, and then check and contain them. Seek credible sources of factual information over and above the entertaining drama of wild reports and survival-of-self-above-all-others mentalities.

Participate in and demonstrate actions that are part of the solution to this pandemic and not part of the problems. Don’t become a pawn in the panic-buying dysfunctional human response.

Even though we may not be able to know if undiagnosed people around us are shedding the coronavirus, they still all deserve to be loved just as much as we do.

Yes, even if they believe crackpot theories that have no basis in scientific fact.

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One Theory

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I don’t understand why issues like brash disregard for ethical protocols, such as a refusal to release tax returns or to divest financial holdings to avoid conflicts of interest, goes unresolved and then is allowed to fade from view. The issues were never addressed, but they seem to have disappeared from the national dialogue.

It’s as if time heals all wounds. If we stop talking about the evidence of potential for kleptocracy, things will actually be okay. Maybe there will be no ethical violations by billionaires in government.

It feels like the difference of perceptions to the issues unfolding before us in this country are vast. It is hard for people to merge varying possibilities, so they cling to one extreme or another. The political anger that led folks toward making their choice on election day, and the reactions to what has happened since, could be seen as a natural product of that.theory

A theory about that political anger caught my eye in an NPR article yesterday.

http://www.mprnews.org/story/2017/02/06/npr-the-theory-that-explains-the-anger-of-our-political-moment

Relative deprivation.

Being deprived of something a person thinks they are entitled to.

That is one way to explain the anger of the moment.

I’m feeling a little deprived of a collective common sense lately. And decency. And diplomacy, but I’d settle for just the common sense, if that were even possible.

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Written by johnwhays

February 8, 2017 at 7:00 am

Luxury’s Lap

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I have to admit that genuine moments do actually occur when Delilah settles down on her day-bed for a nap under her own initiative. I find it a bit startling to come down the hallway and find her so elegantly settled in. I was so impressed last night, I took a picture.IMG_4183e

She is livin’ in the lap of luxury around here, I tell ya.

Dog ownership is not something I have done as an adult, until we got Delilah almost a year and a half ago. My knowledge and experience are still rather limited. I’m learning on the fly, or walk, as the case may be.

Back at our old house, where we subscribed to cable tv, I used to watch Cesar Millan’s Dog Whisperer program where he trains people to handle dogs, and his methods all seemed like common sense to me. Common sense is what I have primarily relied upon for my interactions with Delilah.

I do regret throwing out Cesar’s basic rule about not letting the dog lead a walk, pulling me along behind, but that is how we operate. Ever since we changed to keeping her leashed (since she began to regularly run off to visit the neighboring properties around us), we have needed to take her for walks.

Let me just back up a moment here and point out that this is something I said I would not do —keep a dog on a leash. I guess that was before I was being paid to take care of her. When we created the position of Ranch Manager, the responsibility of caring for all our animals shifted to me. Right now, she doesn’t get free-run privileges, so I walk her on a leash, chewing on my words all the while.

I used to also diligently avoid ever tending to the cat’s litter box. Funny how things change over time. I picked up more cat litter at the grocery store yesterday (grocery shopping being another thing I once shunned with gusto).

Who am I? I don’t have any idea any more. Don’t bother asking.

But I digress. Back to walking Delilah and learning about her by simply living with her. I decided to let her walk in front because it feels like a simulation of how she would behave without being leashed. I have been letting her choose the route (unless I have a more pressing agenda), and allow her to stop and investigate enticing scents. I let her practice hunting rodents and wait patiently as she pounces on some grass and then listens to see if anything moves. She works feverishly to pursue the source of some scent that must be fresh, based on her reaction.

I call it “practice” because she almost never catches anything. I’ve watched plenty a critter scramble away while she remains oblivious to its departure.

I have been pretty vocal about her passion for eating other animal’s poo. It drives me nuts. She works way too hard to break loose frozen poop she finds on the trail during our walks. I have recently gained new insight on this behavior, but I don’t know what it means.

There appears to be an animal, or something an animal has eaten, to which she has quite a different reaction. Several times I have watched her sniff a pile of scat and then leap sideways and make a conscious effort to give it a wide berth.

Apparently, it turns out our dog has discerning taste in animal poo.

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Written by johnwhays

December 9, 2014 at 7:00 am

Posted in Chronicle

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