Relative Something

*this* John W. Hays’ take on things and experiences

Gettin’ There

with 4 comments

Well, in case you haven’t noticed, today is June 14th. It just so happens, the Tour of Minnesota biking and camping week starts on June 15th. Holy COW, that’s tomorrow! I suppose I better start getting ready to go.

Today is my last day at the day-job before starting this annual biking adventure. After that, it’s a quick stop for some supplies, a rush home to get some grass cut, and then it will be time to start packing.

Tent, check. Sleeping bag, check. Bike, check. Helmet, check. Bike shoes, check. As long as I pack those essentials, I will be functional. The rest is just superfluous accoutrements.

Okay, maybe I’ll bring a camera, and some clothes, a sleeping pad, sunscreen lotion, and ibuprofen. But that’s it. That’s all I need.

Oh, and a toothbrush. Spare shoes. A raincoat. A hat.

I found our old original Foxtail toy. I’m bringing the Foxtail

After dinner yesterday, in order to check off a couple of chores from my pre-departure list, I pulled out the diesel tractor and attached the loader. Cyndie and I transferred three large piles of composted manure to a remote location, to provide plenty of open space in the compost area before I go.

Whenever I was off dumping a full bucket, the chickens would show up to check out what Cyndie was doing. I could see them scamper away each time I returned. Eventually, I paid them a visit on foot to offer my regards.

They are just starting to show hints of what they will look like when they mature and start producing eggs.

As of last night, we still have all twelve birds. This kind of success is what breeds our willingness to keep trying the unencumbered free-range life for them.

After they start getting hunted again, our thoughts will change, I’m sure.

Speaking of them getting hunted… while the world was all caught up in the escapades of the downtown St. Paul raccoon that scaled a 23-story building in the wee hours of Wednesday morning, we had our very own varmint contemplating a climb up the side of our 1-story coop.

I admit, it wasn’t nearly as exciting, but it made for a cool capture on the trail cam.

You can almost read his mind, as he computes the potential reward of maybe gettin’ up there.

I wonder if I should be electrifying the hardware cloth that covers the windows. I’m hoping there is no reward whatsoever should he or she actually decide to make that climb.

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Written by johnwhays

June 14, 2018 at 6:00 am

4 Responses

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  1. How about a live trap and relocation?

    wtbell

    June 14, 2018 at 11:40 am

    • Good thinking. Worked for MPR! It might turn out to be a full-time job in our case, based on the number of coons making passes in front of the camera each night.
      I’m skeptical about the ease of finding a place willing to accept all the critters I’d need to relocate, but who knows?

      johnwhays

      June 14, 2018 at 11:47 pm

      • Actually, I see that I only glanced at the pic: I was thinking more about foxes! Do raccoons actually hunt animals as large as a chicken? They probably would raise havoc with any eggs they came across if they got inside the hen house. I think of them more as scavengers?

        wtbell

        June 15, 2018 at 8:40 am

      • Yes, I think you are absolutely right about that. From our reading about the fox, a live trap can deal with an immediate intruder, but others will undoubtably fill the void. Not really a reason to then do nothing, but we are leaning toward trying to coexist with the devil we know for now.

        johnwhays

        June 15, 2018 at 8:56 am


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